Remade – SerialBox – Review

Every minute, 108 people die. On October 14th, 2016, from 9:31-9:32 p.m., 23 of those deaths will be teenagers. Now they are humanity’s last hope for survival. Awakened in a world they barely recognize and hunted by mechanical horrors, these teens search for answers amidst the ruins of civilization. Fate, love, and loyalty face off in this adrenaline – pumping YA adventure.

Team-written by some of today’s most popular YA authors, ReMade is brought to you by Matthew Cody (Super), Andrea Phillips (Revision), Kiersten White (And I Darken), Gwenda Bond (Girl on a Wire), Carrie Harris (Bad Taste in Boys), and E. C. Myers (The Silence of Six).
Season One will unfold across 15 episodes beginning September 14 th , with a new installment dropping every Wednesday until the season finale on December 21 st.

SerialBox

Approached about reading the first two episodes of this new series, I jumped at the chance to be a part of what I am sure is to be the next big thing in literature.

Let’s talk about suspense for a moment.

Picture this: Season 3 of your favorite television show. Last episode of the season. Enrique is confessing his love for Penelope over the phone from his plush Audi zooming down the highway. Suddenly the camera cuts to headlights, then Penelope’s face as she listens to deafening noise followed by silence on the line. Fade to black. Now you’re sobbing on your couch, covered in nacho cheese and chip crumbs, texting Alicia and probably your mom (don’t lie) about how you can’t wait for Season 4 to come out next fall.

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Now we’re all book lovers here, and most of us love suspense. We hate it, but we love it. Imagine your favorite book with a breathtaking cliffhanger every week. I know sometimes I get a book and devour it in x amount of hours only to feel unsatisfied when it’s over.

With SerialBox, you’ll read a new installment every week until the plot arcs into a satisfying resolution. Our reading culture is demanding a fresh take on literature, and SerialBox is delivering.

When you think Remade, think Maze Runner x The Hunger Games. These kids are fighting for their life in a dystopian setting, chased by terrifying metal spiders, and you kind of get the sense that someone, somewhere, is watching what’s going on.

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Episode One written by Matthew Cody

Shadows and Dreams

In the first installment, Cody gave me exactly what I needed to become invested in the plot. Scrawny boy joins school play for pretty girl. I’m a sucker for guys who dress in fairy tights to impress ye ole maiden.

On a serious note, Cody takes what can be a confusing set up and breaks it down into intimate moments. All it takes is one bad chapter to put a reader off what could be an amazing series. At first, a hackneyed plot device made me wince. I’ve seen enough YA novels start off with a dream that isn’t really a dream at all, and I am not convinced that out of the  7.4 billion people on Earth we cannot come up with a more creative way to introduce a concept. Thankfully, that’s where my qualms end.

Holden is your typical teenage boy, joining plays to impress his longtime crush, Seyah. The only problem is he literally dies trying. And here I thought the worst thing that could happen is rejection.

When he wakes up, he’s in a different world and I don’t mean the world of ~love~. He and his super dead (Maybe dead? They’re not sure.. I’m not sure..) crush have to fight for their lives on their daring escape and right when we think we’re about to find something out, the installment ends with Holden, Seyah, and their newfound guardian Umpta descending to Earth (or at least we guess it’s Earth because Holden has no clue, really) in a giant space elevator.

Episode Two written by Andrea Phillips

Hungry

The second installment doesn’t quite pick up where we left off, signaling our first point of view change.

Now we’re following who I hope will turn into one of my favorite characters of all time, May. I love nothing more than an intelligent woman who makes the male ego feel inferior in a novel. May sounds a lot like me, and even though I’d like to brag and say it’s because she’s super smart and driven, it’s more because she died from being over-prepared.

We follow a bit of May’s story and eventually Holden and Seyah join the frey. By frey I mean a group of anywhere from 24-30 teenagers stranded in a jungle with little to no rations and a bunch of alien spider robot things possibly coming to attack at any moment. Believe me, this makes for some of the best dialogue you’ll ever read in your life. Phillips does a fantastic job of making things believable in the reality she creates.

Here is where we get our most important bit of information thus far: all of the teenagers seem to be “cured” of anything that ailed them before waking up. This seems to be the biggest hint at the title so far along with the every mysterious Umpta’s statement that the “caretakers” remade them.


We, like May, are left with a lot of questions. What if no one comes to find them? What if they can’t locate a food source? Who are the caretakers? What the heck is going on and where the heck are they anyway? Good questions, May. Good questions.


Overall, I’m very impressed with the work and accessibility that Matthew Cody (Super) and Andrea Phillips (Revision) have fostered into the first two installments and can’t wait to see what Kiersten White (And I Darken), Gwenda Bond (Girl on a Wire), Carrie Harris (Bad Taste in Boys), and E. C. Myers (The Silence of Six) can add to the mix.

Would recommend if…

  • …you enjoy YA literature involving life after death.
  • …you enjoy multiple POVs and author collaborations.
  • …you’re having trouble getting your middle schooler to read something.
  • …you like James Dashner.

5/5 Stars

 

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